31. Oct, 2016

31.10.16 Chiquimula, Guatemala.

Firstly, Paul seems to have turned the corner today, he has started chatting a lot more, and feels much less wobbly, so I’m hoping that’s a sign of recovery.  I think we’ll stay here for a few more days yet, until he is 100% fit.  We can’t afford to be under par, and Paul needs to have full concentration when driving on the unfamiliar roads, and with the busy, erratic traffic.

 

It’s quite a walk into town, and I haven’t wanted to leave Paul for too long, so I haven’t had a look around yet, perhaps tomorrow, although I am quite enjoying the rest as well.  It’s amazing how fatigue builds up inside you, and we were talking earlier about how all of our senses are working hard all the time, as we constantly encounter new experiences. It can sometimes be difficult to process all that we see and do quickly enough.  This is the main reason why I decided to try and record our experiences and feelings about them.   I also hope that we might be giving readers of our blog an insight into the places we have visited, and a feel of what it might be like there.  

 

As I mentioned before, we have been immersed in the world of motorcycles in one form or another, and have been for many years.  We have also read lots of world travel biographical books, by all means of transport, and found these stories enjoyable and inspiring.  We are also in touch with, or can read stories daily of people who are also travelling throughout the world, mainly by motorcycle, so this stuff seems normal to us.  It’s easy to forget that most people reading this will not think this type of malarkey is normal!

 

People have different reasons for travelling. Paul has always had a thirst for travelling somewhere, for ‘going along’ being on the road. For him it’s always been about the journey, the going somewhere, it doesn’t really matter where it is.  My interest began when we first started travelling together 25 years ago, and has grown from there. I like to quietly observe what’s going on, and try to record the differences, and similarities, of peoples, and places and if those people seem to have a difficult time where they live, why that might be, in comparison to their neighbours.

 

Sometimes it’s hard to see past the warnings of other people, (particularly country to country), for instance the lady at the hotel here told us that the mosquitoes in Mexico and Honduras (which both border Guatemala) are different, much worse, carry many more diseases- but how do the mosquitoes know which country they are in? We encounter a lot of caution of the unknown place, or people, and making our steps to trust that the next place we go will be as good as the last is a huge leap of faith sometimes, but can also be a very beneficial one. There’s a lot of good people out there in this world.  What a wonderful opportunity we have, we are so lucky to be out here, exploring and finding this out for ourselves.